The FRH Torch initiative: an Olympic contribution to Culture and Heritage

The European Year of Cultural Heritage (EYCH) 2018 will offer a unique chance to showcase that religious heritage is not only a legacy from the past but also a resource for the future.

The Year will feature cultural events in thousands of cities and towns across Europe, being the largest public arts and cultural manifestation of European history.

As part of its contribution to EYCH 2018, and inspired by the Olympic Flame in Athens, FRH is thrilled to launch the Torch of Culture and Heritage, an initiative that will offer a unique chance to celebrate the diverse elements of our European identity.

We would be delighted that you join FRH’s call for action to light the Torch of Culture and Heritage with your favourite story, memory or experience in the context of cultural heritage.  Continue reading

Opening the Centre for Religion and Heritage at the University of Groningen

By Todd Weir, Director

On 25 October, we officially launched the Centre for Religion and Heritage (CRH) of the University of Groningen with the participation of F.J. Paas, the King’s Commissioner in Groningen. The Former Courtroom at the Faculty of Religious Studies and Theology in Oude Ebbingstraat was filled to capacity with students and scholars, but above all with representatives of the leading Dutch heritage organizations and museums. This was a testimony to the urgent need for scholarly focus on the issue of religious heritage in the Netherlands.

Opening the Centre for Religion and Heritage at the University of Groningen

On the picture René Paas, Dr Mathilde van Dijk and Prof. Todd Weir. Image RD

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Spazio Kor, an audience development strategy from a baroque church in Asti, Italy

Photo2Different artistic expressions, a single interdisciplinary place. Theatre shows, figurative arts, events, meetings… Spazio Kor is the ideal place to create a new cultural experience, an ideal reference point for cultural research and innovation thanks to a new inclusive and participatory approach in the re-use of cultural religious heritage. Continue reading

Norway: tourists wearing and tearing the stave churches

Many ancient churches in the world started off as simple wooden structures. Through time and increasing wealth of the Church and communities, most of them were replaced with stone buildings. Wooden churches, also known as stave churches in different parts of Europe, are therefore rare and offer unique insights into our heritage and history. However, little is done to preserve this ever so distinguishing heritage for future generations.

Lom stave church

Lom stave church is one the most visited churches in all of Norway. The use of carpets can be a smart move to mitigate mechanical wear and tear to surfaces. But what happens with the floor beneath when we trudge around with our soaked clothes and shoes? Photo: Fredrik Berg.

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The Fortified Churches of Transylvania, UNESCO Heritage, Where To?

Dobarca - Photo by Alexander KloosThe South-eastern part of Transylvania is renowned for its fortified churches built since the 13th century. These served as a defence form until the last Ottoman incursion into Transylvania, 1788. The fortified churches are specific to the Saxon and Szekely villages located in this area, and are part of the European phenomenon of fortified churches.

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Unique 19th-Century British Church in Pontresina reveals its charm for visitors

NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH VISITORS AND THEIR CHURCH IN PONTRESINAHistoric English church architecture in Switzerland highlights the importance of the 19th-Century summer seasons by presenting in the Museum Alpin Pontresina some well-known British personalities who visited Pontresina and the built heritage that they left behind but which sadly no longer exists.
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UK: Shake up for Grants for Places of Worship

A major change has been announced in the way that church repair and modernisation projects are funded in the UK by the Heritage Lottery Fund which uses money raised by National Lottery players to help protect heritage. From September 2017, the Heritage Lottery Fund’s (HLF) Grants for Places of Worship programme will close to new applications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Continue reading